terça-feira, 12 de novembro de 2013

PLATTERMEN - Old Devil Wine (1972 Ireland Rock Psych Folk Blues Funky)


VENENO SUPER RARÍSSIMO!!
SUPER RARE ALBUM!!

BANDA FORMADA EM 1964 MAS QUE LANÇOU UM ALBUM SOMENTE EM 1972!! NA VERDADE TRATA-SE DE UMA COLETÂNEA DE SEUS SINGLES GRAVADOS COM UMA NOVA ROUPAGEM MAIS SETENTISTA!! ESSE ALBUM SE TORNOU UM DOS MAIS RAROS E CAROS ENTRE COLECIONADORES IRLANDESES E AO REDOR DO MUNDO PORQUE NUNCA FOI REEDITADO!! VENENO RARÍSSIMO E EXCLUSIVO DO BLOG VENENOS DO ROCK!!

MOST LP'S ON THIS LABEL ARE FOLK ORIENTATED BUT THIS IS DEFINETLY ROCK - IT EVEN SAYS ON BACK SLEEVE 'FILE UNDER ROCK'. MANY VARIOUS STYLES HERE FROM PSYCH, BLUES , COUNTRY & HEAVY ROCK!!

In 1960 four brass players from Omagh – Ray Moore, Leo Doran, Billy McGinty, and Pat Chesters – started The Platters Paramount Showband. Recruiting country & western crooner Brian Coll, and changing their name because of the American doo-wop group of the same name, by the mid ’60s The Plattermen were a major draw on the showband ballroom circuit. From 1965 on they released a string of country and pop ballads including I’ll Take You Home Again, Kathleen, and in 1966 - in an adaptation of Roger Miller’s England Swings - they paid tribute to the scene by singing that “Ireland swings like nowhere else can, swings to the sound of the big showband. Pixies and Freshmen, the Capitol too, maybe the Plattermen’s the band for you.”  

Times were changing however, and their music began to lose its appeal. In 1967 bass player Rob Strong and guitarist Alan McCartney joined, and the following year Brian Coll left to be replaced by singer Simon Scott. The Plattermen began experimenting with a more contemporary sound; while Scott would continue to sing pop and ballad material, Strong became the driving force in the group by singing heavier soul / R’n'B tracks. By 1970 they were being hailed for this new direction with the release of the Strong-fronted single Smiling Faces (a cover of the Traffic song). The band themselves declared in a magazine announcement, “In ’71 We’re Goin’ Kinda Heavy”, and when they released an album in 1972 it bore the legend “File under Rock” - the band clearly keen to prove they had turned a corner.

That album – actually their first, notwithstanding a 1970 greatest hits collection of their singles with Coll – was Old Devil Wine, recorded in Dublin and released through the local Dolphin Records label. It was in marked contrast to their earlier material, with mostly original songs owing a debt to the brass-led soul blues rock sound of Blood Sweat & Tears more than anyone else. The track African Wah Wah was credited to The Plattermen’s John Trotter, although it’s clearly a straight cover of Santana’s Soul Sacrifice (albeit spiced with the addition of Trotter’s violin), but this aside, the album has come to be very highly regarded among collectors of both Irish music and rock music in general. The fact that it has never been re-issued has caused it to become among the most expensive Irish rock records.  
 

01. Old Devil Wine
02. Play To-Day, Play To-Day
03. Julie
04. African Wah Wah
05. Love Song
06. Gimme That Wine
07. Blue
08. Cat’s Eye
09. Country Boy Blues
10. That’s It
11. You Don’t Love Me
12. Help Me Doctor Jesus
13. I’m Goin’ Home
14. Tawny Wine    

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