quinta-feira, 26 de março de 2009

REQUEST: MAY BLITZ – May Blitz (1970 UK Heavy Rock Progressive)


CONFORME DEFINIU UM COLEGA MEU NUMA VIAGEM DE CARRO QUE FIZEMOS E EU COLOQUEI ESTE DISCO PRA ESCUTAR: "ISSO É MÚSICA DE MACONHEIRO"!! MAY BLITZ! QUE BANDA! QUE SOM CHAPANTE! É MUITO BOM MESMO!! POWER TRIO DE PRIMEIRA QUALIDADE!! VENENO DO BÃO!! TANTO QUE COLOCO ESTE QUE É O PRIMEIRO DA BANDA E MAIS O SEGUNDO ALBUM LOGO A SEGUIR!!

1) May Blitz (alongside Rory Gallagher's Taste) were among the first of the newly formed hard rock power trios to take up the challenge of Cream and the Jimi Hendrix Experience; that is, making the biggest possible noise with the smallest available lineup, but never losing sight of melody and finesse while they did so. Certainly anyone catching their early live show was guaranteed to leave with their ears ringing but their brainbox humming, and the band's debut album was a seamless reiteration of their in-concert impact, all the way down to the extended riffing and miniature solos.
May Blitz's strongest point, in terms of audience recognition, was drummer Tony Newman, and fans of the jazz-inflected style that he injected into the Jeff Beck Group certainly won't be disappointed by what they find here -- indeed, with guitarist James Black beside him, it's not difficult to compare May Blitz to the Beck band's Beck-Ola, and find the better-known disc come up wanting every time. The epic "Smoking the Day Away" kicks things off in dynamic form, laying down the grinding, almost proto-metallic assault that was May Blitz's raison d'etre; later in the set, "Dreaming," "Virgin Waters," and "Squeet" all howl with a vengeance that might sound a little old-fashioned today, but was breathtakingly fresh at the time. Even better is "Fire Queen," which essentially blueprints the best parts of every metal act from Judas Priest to the Cult, except it doesn't hang around long enough to spoil the effect. Rather like May Blitz themselves, in fact.

2) The band consisted of ex-Jeff Beck Group drummer Tony Newman, with two Canadian guys (residing in England at the time), bassist Reid Hudson and guitarist/vocalist James Black. This is what I call a power trio, sticking to bluesy hard rock, with some psych and prog rock thrown in. A lot of times the music reminds me of the Jimi Hendrix experience, thanks to Hendrix-like guitars, but often the band meanders in to some intense, mindblowing jams. Plus the lyrics often tend to be hippie oriented, such as the drug-oriented "Smoking the Day Away", the back to the land theme of "I Don't Know?" or the psychedelic "Tomorrow May Come".
Another favorite of mine is "Squeet" with some rather crude lyrics. Another worth mentioning is "Fire Queen". It sounds a whole lot like The Crazy World of Arthur Brown. Replace the Hammond organ with guitars and you get an idea how that song is like. Amazing stuff, and if you like bluesy hard rock, or collect Swirl Vertigo label albums (which this album was released on), you gotta have this album.

Jamie Black (vocals, guitar)
Reid Hudson (bass)
Tony Newman (drums)

1 Smoking the Day Away 8:21
2 I Don't Know? 4:45
3 Dreaming 6:35
4 Squeet 6:51
5 Tomorrow May Come 4:46
6 Fire Queen 4:18
7 Virgin Waters 6:34

http://rapidshare.com/files/213776417/May-First_Venenos.rar
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