terça-feira, 3 de janeiro de 2012

Indescribably Delicious - Good Enough To Eat (1969 US Psychedelia Garage)


BANDA OBSCURA E QUE ERA UMA PEQUENA RAMIFICAÇÃO DA BANDA "STRAWBERRY ALARM CLOCK", POIS TINHA A PARTICIPAÇÃO EM ALGUMAS MUSICAS DO VOCALISTA DA STRAWBERRY E DEPOIS O GUITARRISTA DA INDESCRIBABLY FOI TOCAR NA STRAWBERRY!! AINDA TINHA A PARTICIPAÇÃO DE "ERNIE JOSEPH" DA BANDA BIG BROTHER EM ALGUMAS CANÇÕES!! A BANDA CHEGOU A ABRIR SHOWS PARA BANDAS COMO THE SEEDS, MUSIC MACHINE, STEPPENWOLS, THE YARDBIRDS E BUFFALO SPRINGFIELD!! 

Include members from Big Brother & Strawberry Alarm Clock. The group was formed in the Bay Area in the early sixties. By the mid 1960's the group was opening for such acts as Steppenwolf, The Turtles, The Yardbirds, and several other popular acts of the day. After recording a bunch of singles for the All American label they released this first complete recording in 1969. The album cover is quite provocative and colorful, when one considers when this was released. Today people would not bat an eyelash or give it a second glance.


Several years after originally writing this review, I received an e-mail from Indescribably Delicious (known universally as I.D.)'s vocalist, Jim Conroy, giving me the true story of the band and 1999's cobbled-together Good Enough to Eat! They were an L.A. Bay Area beat group who formed in the early '60s and released one single on a local label, also home to the iconic Strawberry Alarm Clock. After the band split, their ex-manager, Gary Solo(mon), got Jim to sing on some demos he was recording with Greg Munford, who sang on the Clock's iconic Incense And Peppermints. Jim wasn't over-keen on the material, but was eventually sent an acetate of the rather amateurish sessions, with the three I.D. tracks added. About a decade later, Jim was persuaded to part with a copy of the acetate to a record-collector friend. Fast-forward a decade or two...

In the late '90s, Jim got a call from the Strawberry Alarm Clock's old manager, Bill Holmes, whingeing about a European bootleg of songs that he 'owned'; turns out some chancers have put the acetate out as a CD, crediting it to Indescribably Delicious. Holmes sued and got the rights back to the recordings, subsequently licencing them out himself, getting material from Jim for the package. It crept out some months later as Good Enough to Eat!; Holmes has evaded any tedious financial responsibilities, meaning Jim won't get any royalties from the release, despite having sung on the whole thing. It's the same old, same old story, isn't it? Anyway, to the actual album:


It's (unsurprisingly, all things considered) a bit of a mish-mash of styles, with the three tracks from their lone single session (The Kids Are Alright/Baby I Love You/Brother Where Are You) rubbing shoulders with the demos, which are of a rather dated psychedelic bent. Their version of The Who's The Kids Are Alright has a wrong chord, which can apparently be blamed on Solo's rearrangement of the song, much of the rest being OK, but really nothing special. In 1969, the Mellotron had barely had any impact in the States at all, although, of course, the originator of the tape-replay concept, Harry Chamberlin, had been building his machines in California since the early '50s. As a result, the 'is it/isn't it?' dilemma hovering over this album is resolved by its final track, The World Is Ended Right Now, which is smothered in that weird Chamberlin solo male voice, proving beyond a doubt that the Chamby had vocal tapes several years before the 'Tron. Anyway, keyboards were played by both Munford and Jack Bielan, so I've no idea which one plays the Chamby, but there's also strings on Big Ben, one of the album's more psychedelically-inclined numbers, and on the more straightforward The Rest Of My Life.

So; a rather ordinary album, probably best described as a 'curio', to be honest. Three Chamberlin tracks, but apart from the male vocal (which may just possibly crop up elsewhere, too), it's all rather run-of-the-mill. Jim Conroy's clearly fairly unhappy about the whole business, though also fairly sanguine, and who can blame him? As he says, he's still playing today and has never had to do the crapulent 'oldies' circuit, like so many one-hit wonders. To sum up, this album is NOT the original I.D., except for three tracks, and they aren't especially representative of the band's garage glory.

Indescribably Delicious - No Time To Answer

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